9 Comments
Feb 10, 2023Liked by Emily Alhadeff

Choose the school and professors carefully. The best strategy today would be to major in a field in which grading is objective, i.e. science, and take humanities electives with professors who are fair and not hostile. This means that Jewish students need to have intensive, traditional European training in math, physics and chemistry, with the theorem proofs in math, to be equal to students coming out of the best schools in France. Looking back on large schools vs. small schools, at a large school, individual students are not noticed as much, and it’s easier to just be one of the crowd and get through, especially for a doctorate.

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Yes, modernity is a challenge for some. Should Jews stop sending their kids to college? You've got to be kidding here!

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This aged like fine wine.

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founding

Education, including higher education, is emancipating. To avoid this opportunity condemns future generations to intellectual and economic enslavement. Hurt feelings because someone called you a name? Get over it.

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Leaders of the Jewish community need to start meeting personally with the Secretary of Education, Miguel Cardona.

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The other way Jews can stand up for ourselves is for people around the world to put their DNA into GEDMatch so that the family trees of the Jewish people can be rebuilt and that we know who we are. Ian Levine in the UK has built one family tree of 20,000 people going all the way back to the 1700s and ultimately to Rashi and King David. (A professor matched me to this tree and I am learning how to do the DNA matching on GEDMatch.) Ian Levine is now working on a second large family tree. Our family structures were decimated and DNA can allow us to get them back. Some of us grew up as if the stork dropped our families onto the earth.

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There were many times when I faced severe anti-Semitism, even though I tried to choose schools where it wouldn't happen. It wasn't so much hatred of Jews, but the fair haired boy syndrome. Professors would actively promote the careers of white, non-Jewish men. I studied music composition at Princeton. None of the Jewish students went on to a full time faculty position. Most never even finished the Ph.D. It was the passive aggressiveness. Somehow, the most Anglo students were moved forward. I was bullied by a student from Australia and one from England. I didn't stand up for myself enough and no one advised me to. I should have been in the dean's office every week. I thought I should be able to deal with it myself and with a therapist, as if it were my problem, not the school's problem. the anti-Semitism is now more overt. But there is still anti-Black and anti-Asian sentiment in academia. There are numerous talented Asian and American composers all over the US, and there were in the 1990s, and they didn't get the big jobs either. Chen Yi and her husband got a job at University of Missouri, where their anti-Communist message was valued. I didn't try to go to the Midwest. One of the problems is that Jewish organizations are providing educational programs. But there is a gap when it comes to standing up for individuals who experience the anti-Semitism and making sure that their individual experience protected. Providing educational programs is not enough. With respect to affinity groups, if a school refuses to accept a Jewish proposal for a club on campus, the group has the right to sue under the non-discrimination laws. Legal teams are needed to stand up for individuals.

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